Aquarius Dates: January 20 to February 18


Aquarius dates in astrology are typically from January 20-February 18. If your birthday falls in this date range, you are an Aquarius Sun sign. Although Aquarius horoscope birth dates can change depending on the year, these are usually the Aquarius calendar dates.

For about 30 days each year, the Sun travels through the part of the zodiac occupied by Aquarius. January 20-February 18 is typically the Aquarius birth date range. Occasionally, the Aquarius start date will be a day earlier, or the Aquarius end date will fall a day earlier or later.

Aquarius is the eleventh sign of the zodiac, which contains 12 signs in total. The Aquarius star sign is a sociable air sign (element) and a tenacious fixed sign (quality). As the only fixed air sign in the zodiac, Aquarius people will passionately advocate for their cutting-edge ideas. They can be rebels and Type A rule-enforcers all at the same time—an unusual and sometimes confusing combination. If you date an Aquarius, prepare to give them lots of freedom. You’ll also need to embrace their million friends, as this sign is happiest when surrounded by a motley crew of quirky kindred spirits.

The constellations have shifted. Is there a different Aquarius birth date range now?

Periodically, astronomers will announce “breaking news” that horoscopes aren’t accurate because the constellations have shifted. Or they will announce is a 13th zodiac sign, citing the constellation Ophiucus and claiming that the horoscope dates for Aquarius (and every other sign) have changed.

Here’s an interesting bit of clarification between astronomy and astrology. The actual constellations have shifted over the ages, but astrology follows a different system, which uses “artificial” constellations. Rather than following the movement of the visible stars, Western astrology is based on the apparent path of the Sun as seen from our vantage point on earth. Within that path, astrologers have carved out static zones, and we track the planetary movements against these. That is why Aquarius dates remain the same even as the heavens keep shifting.

In second century Alexandria, the great mathematician and astronomer/astrologer Ptolemy created the Tropical Zodiac, which is a fixed system that is not affected by changes in the constellations or the Earth’s axis. Ptolemy used the same names for the zodiac signs as he did for the constellations, which is why there is confusion around the Aquarius birth date range. The Tropical Zodiac is static and not affected by shifts in the Earth’s axis. It begins every year with the Aries pseudo-constellation, which is based on the position of the Sun at the spring equinox on March 21.

As the website Astrologer.com explains it:

Western astrology is based on the planets and their motion relative to our year (the Earth’s annual orbit of the Sun) and not on the distant stars. Before astrologers started to compile planetary tables, the backdrop of the distant visible ‘fixed’ stars proved to be most consistent system for measuring the positions of the ‘wandering stars’, known as the planets in our solar system. The 12 sign zodiac was defined by the stars within chosen constellations along the ecliptic (the apparent annual path of the Sun) in Mesopotamia at the end of the Iron Age (around 500 BC). Though the Babylonians used stars and constellations for measurement, they were also using zones which start from the position of the Sun at the March Equinox which was, is and will always be the start of the sign of Aries in the western system.

Vedic Astrology and Aquarius star sign dates

Vedic astrology, also known as Jyotisha, is the traditional Hindu astrology system. It is based on the Sidereal zodiac, or Nirayana, which is an imaginary 360-degree “belt” of zodiac signs divided into 12 equal sectors. However, Vedic astrology is different from Western astrology in that it measures the fixed zodiac, rather than the moving zodiac. So in Vedic astrology, the Aquarius dates would be February 13-March 12. Go figure!

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